Busy Bookworms

SATS and 11 Plus tuition in Hertfordshire

Learning and development is encouraged with each unique child through positive relationships and by enabling the environment.

All children develop at their own rate and in their own ways. Development statements should not necessarily be taken in order or as a checklist. Aligned to Development Matters and EYFS statutory framework 2017.

Physical Development – Moving and Handling:

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    Watches and explores hands and feet

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    Reaches out and holds objects

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    Lean forward to pick up small toys and objects
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    Pass toys from hand to hand – hold an object in each hand
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    Pick up small objects between thumb and forefinger

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    Enjoy sensory experiences of making marks in paint/sand

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    Begin to use words endings – going
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    Hold a pen/crayon using the whole hand

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    Make random marks with different strokes

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    Make connections between their movement and the marks made
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    Show control in holding larger objects and mark making tools
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    Begin to use three fingers – tripod grip to hold writing tools

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    Imitate drawing simple shapes – circles and lines
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    Show preference for a dominant hand
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    Make snips in paper with scissors
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    Hold pencil between thumb and two fingers

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    Copy some letters from name

Reading:

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    Handle books with interest

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    Show an interest in books and rhymes
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    Repeat words or phrases from familiar stories
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    Fill in a missing word or phrase from a favourite story
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    Show awareness of rhyme and alliteration
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    Listen to and join in with repeated refrains

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    Handle books carefully
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    Describe simply a character or setting
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    Suggest how a story ends

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    Recognise familiar logos and signs
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    Look at books independently and turn pages
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    Continue a rhyming string
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    Hear and say initial sound in words

Listening and Attention:

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    Turn towards familiar sounds
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    React to interaction with others – smiling, looking, moving
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    Concentrate on an object or activity of choosing for short periods
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    Enjoy rhymes and demonstrate listening
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    Recognise and respond to familiar sounds
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    Listen to others in one to one or small groups
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    Listen to stories with increasing attention
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    Join in with repeated refrains

Writing:

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    Distinguish between different marks made

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    Sometimes give meaning to marks as they draw and paint

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    Ascribe meaning to marks seen in different places
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    Continue a rhyming string

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    Hear and say initial sounds in words

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    Link some sounds to letters

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    Use some clearly identifiable letters to communicate meaning

Communication and Language – Understanding:

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    Stops and looks when hears name

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    Follows body language – pointing etc
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    Respond to different things said in familiar contexts

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    Understand single words – mummy, milk, cup etc

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    Select familiar objects by name

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    Understand simple sentences – ‘throw the ball’

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    Identify action words

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    Understand who, what, where in simple questions

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    Show understanding of prepositions – on, under etc

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    Respond to simple instructions

Speaking:

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    Communicate needs in a variety of ways – crying, babbling, squealing etc

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    Practise and develop own speech sounds
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    Use single words and imitate words and sounds

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    Create personal words

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    Copy familiar expressions

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    Begin to ask simple questions and hold a brief conversation
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    Begin to use words endings – going
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    Retell a simple past event
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    Use talk to connect ideas

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    Ask questions and use talk when pretending objects stand for something else.

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